A Random Study to Assess Height, Weight and Bmi of Children Attending Anganwadi Centres in Urban Project Sectors of Trivandram District

Main Article Content

B. Abhina
C. Anitha Chandran

Abstract

Aim: To assess height, weight and BMI (Body Mass Index) of children attending anganwadi centers.

Sample: Ninety children attending the anganwadi centers in the age group of two to six years were studied.

Study Design: A random study was done to assess anthropometric measurements such as height, weight and BMI of children (2-6 years) attending anganwadi centers in the Urban 2 project areas of Trivandrum district, Kerala. Children were selected randomly from sector 1 and sector 4. Data collected were compared with the standard values to find the disparities.

Place of Study: Sectors I and IV in the Urban II project areas of Trivandrum district in Kerala was randomly selected for study.

Methodology: Height, weight and Body Mass Index of 90 children were collected and recorded. Data collected were compared with the standard values to find the deviation among the study population.

Results: 80% of children attending the anganwadi centers were having greater than minimum height standards. Even though majority of children have a body mass index less than 5th percentile indicating the chances of malnutrition.

Conclusion: Children having less than their minimum height and weight requirements requires special attention. Less BMI value indicates the presence of malnutrition and need proper care and attention.

Keywords:
Anganwadi children, height, weight, body mass index (BMI), random study.

Article Details

How to Cite
Abhina, B., & Chandran, C. A. (2020). A Random Study to Assess Height, Weight and Bmi of Children Attending Anganwadi Centres in Urban Project Sectors of Trivandram District. Journal of Applied Life Sciences International, 23(6), 48-54. https://doi.org/10.9734/jalsi/2020/v23i630175
Section
Original Research Article

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