Impact of Yam Postharvest Activities on Standard of Living of Yam Farming Households in North-East Zone of Benue State, Nigeria

Main Article Content

Solomon Arumun Agba
Idu Ode
Comfort Ugbem
Solomon Chimela Nwafor

Abstract

Aims: The aim of the study was to identify postharvest activities of yam farming households in North-East Zone of Benue State, Nigeria and to assess the impact of losses from the yam postharvest activities on standard of living of yam farming households in North-East Zone of Benue State, Nigeria.

Study Design: Survey research design was adopted for the study.

Place and Duration of Study: North-East Zone of Benue State, Nigeria.

Methodology: The study purposively selected three (3) local government areas (Ukum, Katsina-Ala and Logo) that are most prominent in yam production in North-East Zone of Benue State  from where a total  sample size of two hundred and four (204) yam farming households were drawn from three local government areas of North-East Zone of Benue state using multi-stage cluster sampling technique.

Results: Almost all the farmers 99% (202) store their yams and majority of the farmers are also involved in yam marketing. Majority of the famers 84% (172) always need to transport their yams. This could be in order to access distant markets which make for more gain. The few who do not need to transport their produce could be those who sale at farm gates. This could also be the reason why only a few 64% (130) majority take time to sort, grade and clean their produce. With the computed f-statistic value of 512.110 which was significantly higher than the tabulated f-value of 16.26 at 1% level of significance and 5.05 at 5% level of significance, therefore, the null hypothesis was rejected. This implies that, yam loss from yam postharvest activities noted above has a significant negative impact on the standard of living of yam farming households in the study area by reducing their household income (99%), affecting their access to health care services (89%), access to education (64%), access to good housing (84%) and access to sufficient quality food (98%).

Conclusion: The study thus concludes that, yam loss during postharvest activities such as: yam handling, yam storage, yam transportation, yam sorting / grading / cleaning and yam marketing has significant negative impact on the standard of living of yam farming households in the study area, by reducing their household income, affecting their access to health care services, access to education, access to good housing and access to sufficient quality food. The study recommends communication of knowledge on modern yam storage methods to yam farmers in the study area by agricultural extension agents and building of yam processing factories in the study area so as to add economic value to yam and consequently improve the standard of living of yam farming households in the study area.

Keywords:
Impact, post-harvest activities, standard of living, farming households

Article Details

How to Cite
Agba, S., Ode, I., Ugbem, C., & Nwafor, S. (2019). Impact of Yam Postharvest Activities on Standard of Living of Yam Farming Households in North-East Zone of Benue State, Nigeria. Journal of Applied Life Sciences International, 21(1), 1-9. https://doi.org/10.9734/jalsi/2019/v21i130095
Section
Original Research Article

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